Category Archives: personal

my theory of social networking

I know lots of folks who like to have everything they share on one social network (eg Google+) magically appear on all others they use, too (eg Twitter & Facebook).

While I sometimes share identical content out to several networks, I rarely want precisely the same thing going everywhere all the time. In fact, while I love employing Buffer and IFTTT (including using the latter to push content from G+ elsewhere), I rarely like having the same posts (which aren’t links) appear anywhere else.

Why? To ensure I don’t miss some of the conversation or points raised by splitting my attention between, say, Facebook and Google+.

I find that the communities represented on the social networks I use, while overlaps occur, tend to be relatively distinct.

I see this problem occur in communities I belong to, too – such as the BGLUG. There’s a Facebook group, and a Google+ community. When events are scheduled, they get posted both places: which is great for publicity .. but not so much for keeping continuity of community.

Continuity of conversation and interaction is a Big Deal™, in my opinion.

Multiple conversation points are great – but fragmentation of discussion is not so great (eg comments on a blog post + comments on the social network link post of the blog post).

I asked a question about a subset of this problem a few years ago on Stack Overflow – and the best answer for integrating WordPress-to-Facebook commenting was to use a plugin. That’s awesome – but doesn’t begin to solve the problem of discussions across more than one network.

So, for now, I’ll continue to encourage all my socially-network friends, colleagues, family, and readers to keep conversations as separate as possible on the networks they frequent: improve your signal-to-noise ratio, and make the internet a better place.

to wear a watch

I love wearing a nice watch.

Years ago, I would only wear a digital watch in 24hr mode.

Then I switched to using my cell phone.

Now I prefer an analog watch with metal band, and no numbers (ie hour indicators) on the face.

The one I wear now is a Pulsar with a silver (with gold accents) band, blue face, and stopwatch feature. Got it 5 years ago off Woot for under $50 (go go gadget Woot!). My next watch will be one with a black (or black and silver) band, and either a black, silver, dark red, or blue face. Perhaps a SEIKO Black Ion Chronograph Watch. Or maybe a Bulova Marine Star Stainless Steel Chronograph Watch (though I’d prefer a black band on it).

Why do I prefer analog to digital now? And why wear a watch vs using your cell phone?

Because analog clocks give a sense of class that digital just can’t offer, imho, and using your cell phone exclusively to tell time relies on knowing what timezone you are in (and if you’re on the fuzzy edges of two, knowing which tower you’re getting signal from (is it the one in Central, or the one in Mountain?)), and leads to the great potential for distraction to check email, text messages, Facebook, etc, etc, etc.

Watches don’t carry those potentials for distraction the way your phone does.

And they give whomever you are around the sense that you care about how look, but not [necessarily] in a vain manner: you want to pay attention to the time, but not look like the jerk whose ostentatious displays of timekeeping craziness (like the ~$5900 Rolex Explorer Black Dial Domed Bezel Oyster or the not-quite-as nutty-but-still-pricey Citizen Eco-Drive Blue Angels World A-T Stainless Steel Flight Atomic Watch). Wearing a watch gives the impression of focus on whomever you are interacting with, too … so long as you’re not constantly flicking your wrist to check time, of course 😉

Watch wearing is something I think needs to make a major comeback. Join me.

first experiment follow-up

I’ve been attempting a “reactive”/”consumptive” reading experiment recently.

The first book I tried it on was the Henry Petroski’s horrid To Engineer is Human (my review). That turned into a failure as I couldn’t stomach his writing, and so “reacting” to it was going to pretty much be an exercise in futility.

So I’ve ditched that book – maybe someone else will not find it so poor a read.

Many of the books I read (and review) I get from my local library. All of which, therefore, are poor candidates for consumptive reading in the sense Ryan Holiday used the term in his blog post.

But as I dove through his writing a bit more, I saw his mention of a “commonplace book“.

“A commonplace book is a central resource or depository for ideas, quotes, anecdotes, observations and information you come across during your life and didactic pursuits. The purpose of the book is to record and organize these gems for later use in your life, in your business, in your writing, speaking or whatever it is that you do.”

Specifically, he was taught how to do one by Robert Greene (author of Mastery, The 48 Laws of Power, etc), and he cites various individuals in history who have maintained them. It’s also something that Roald Dahl mentioned obliquely in his book The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar and Six More (one of my favorites by him (PDF)) in “Lucky Break” – namely, that he always keeps something on which to write nearby (a notebook, a scrap of envelope – even the dust on his car bumper) so that whenever an idea strikes him, he can jot it down in case it was good enough to actually write about:

“Sometimes, these little scribbles will stay unused in the notebook for five or even ten years. But the promising ones are always used in the end. And if they show nothing else, they do, I think, demonstrate from what slender threads a children’s book or short story must ultimately be woven. The story builds and expands while you are writing it.”

This got me to thinking about how I might integrate the idea myself – though, of course, in a slightly different way. And that’s where I am progressing to now: instead of “consuming” all the books I read, ones I find interesting I’m taking notes on in a composition book (specifically a quad-ruled one, as those are my favorite). I’ve found so far it’s helped form better reviews. It’s also not the only place I’ll keep those notes – many will end up on this blog. Others will end up on Twitter. Others maybe in email signatures, or Facebook posts, or wherever.

In our amazingly digitized world, writing by hand seems, well, old-fashioned and trite. Or hipster-ish and cool. (Depends on who sees you doing it, I think.) Sometimes I’ve already found my notes being done electronically – via SMS to myself, or draft blog posts, or just a quick Notes session on my laptop.

Anyways, where I’m going with all this is instead of always being a mere passive consumer of writing, I’m trying to be a bit more “thoughtful” about it 🙂

magazines

I am the [proud] holder of subscriptions to several magazines.

As part of my attempt to vary my reading materials, I get Wired, Inc, Fast Company, Western Horseman, and several others.

However – I’ve discovered that I just don’t care about most of what is any given issue; there are times when more than half of the magazine is of interest, but usually it’s substantially closer to 10% (excluding ads – include them, and you’re probably down to 5-6%).

It’d be awesome if there was a way of getting a print analogue to an RSS aggregator – in fact, if you know of any, please let me know!

But since there’s not, I’ve adopted a fairly-stringent policy of recycling magazines that show up in my mailbox if I don’t get to them within 2 weeks: and if somehow I miss that deadline, they definitely get scrapped when the new issue arrives.

The only time I will read an out-of-date magazine is when I’m waiting in a doctor’s or dentist’s office, or at the oil change place. There’s just no reason to read “news” and “insights” that old when you can still get them digitally from the magazine websites within days of the print copy arriving in your mailbox.

reading experiment

In follow-up to a recent blog post shared to me by my friend Steven, thinking about my aunt’s old practices, and comments from my wife and another friend, I’m engaging in a “consumptive”/”reactive” reading experiment wherein I am going to do something I haven’t done in a non-workbook book since my time at HVCC – I’m going to try writing in a book.

Two, actually. One is To Engineer Is Human (by Henry Petroski; my review). The second is Knowing God by JI Packer.

Wish me luck. I’ll report back when I’ve completed at least one of the books in the experiment.

“Books are made to be broken–literally or figuratively. I recently bought a 80+ year old book for $76 (a rare book called If It Had Happened Otherwise). I took special pleasure folding the pages and writing on them. It’s mine, why treat it like a delicate flower?” –Ryan Holiday

integrisure – the business that never was

For a long time I have been interested in real, actual, legitimate security. I am not a fan of the widespread use of security theater in our “post-9/11 world”, as Bruce Schneier calls it.

Integrisure was supposed to be a real-world pentesting of “secure” facilities, a la Sneakers. In late 2000 / early 2001, I was working on a business plan and the initial legwork to find out what licensing, certificationss, etc I would need to do security testing at locations like airports.

Integrisure never happened. You can’t google it (well, ok – you can google it now: but you’ll only find this blog post and a bunch of unrelated businesses).

The basic business plan was as follows:

  • establish contacts among management and security directors at various business and government facilities
  • establish time ranges when we can arrive onsite
  • using a team of known, documented, anonymous-looking individuals, find holes in security environments
  • using always non-destructive means, attempt to tail-gate, leave “suspicious” items in conspicuous and inconspicuous locations, gain access to authorized zones, etc
  • have plausible stories pre-built if anyone was “caught”
  • report the results of our simulated attack, including all positives as well as issues, and provide consulting to our client “target” on how they could improve their physical security

More detailed aspects of the planned business were discussed, and written down, between myself and a couple of other folks who wanted to start with me.

We had a start date planned: we would form the company in Jan 2002 (so our fiscal year would align with the calendar year). We had several initial employee/contractors identified – some current or former military members, technical folks, and others.

I had even contacted a couple local companies that did security guard services to see if this was something they would either like to offer as a service, or would help participate in coordinating with their contacts.

Life was looking good. I graduated in May 2001 with my AAS, had some solid job prospects in computer programming and IT work, and was lining-up who I expected would be a great team to start Integrisure’s activities.

Then 9/11 happened.

Airport “security” was federalized, my two front-running programming/IT jobs went on hold and/or laid people off (most of their customers were in downtown Manhattan), and suddenly private companies checking for holes in security were not going to fly. (Especially at airports! 🙂 )