antipaucity

fighting the lack of good ideas

on multiple blogs

I maintain (to greater or lesser extents) 3 blogs currently:

  • https://blog.warrenmyers.com
  • https://paragraph.cf
  • https://antipaucity.com

I keep the first and last segmented so I can more easily find things I’ve written or reposted about Christianity, religion, and the Bible, and everything else. The middle one I keep to demo the WordPress plugin I wrote – Paragraph.

But keeping them going is hard.

Keeping any some going is hard – which is why my eponymous domain warrenmyers.com has been an alias to antiquity.com for quite some time now. Sure, there are still some things findable directly off my domain, but you have to know where and what they are 🙂

How do you, if you run a blog or other website, keep up with putting stuff there?

what if

you blogged as often as you tweeted, facebooked, linkedinned, instagrammed, plogged, pinterested, google plussed, mastodonned, etc?

For many of us, that would be 4, 10, 20, 100, or even more blog posts per day.

Wonder how differently we would view/utilize social media if we took that approach?

Just a thought.

i wrote a thing – paragraph, a simple plugin for wordpress

Along with becoming more active on Mastodon,  I’ve been thinking more about concision recently.

One of the big selling points for Mastodon is that the character limit per post is 500 instead of Twitter’s 140.

And I was thinking, “what if there was a way to force you to write better by writing less / more compactly / more concisely?”

So after a couple weeks, I sat down and wrote an incredibly simple WordPress plugin. Introducing Paragraph.

Paragraph removes all formatting of a post or page, effectively turning it into a wall of text.

How does this help you?

If you see your writing as an uninterrupted wall of text – or a “paragraph” – you may notice that what you’re trying to say is getting lost in the noise.

It could also help force you to write more often but shorter each time.

Or maybe you’ll find it completely useless: and that’s OK, too.

wordpress plugins i use

As promised last time, I now have a page dedicated to the WordPress plugins I use.

Check it out, here.

use prettypress if you’re running a wordpress blog

Like my list of used Chrome Extensions, I’m building a list of recommended WordPress plugins.

But until I get it done, I have to give some pretty big props to PrettyPress. It’s a plugin that lets you edit in Visual, Text, and Markdown – the markup format of sites like reddit, GitHub,, GitLab, and the Stack Exchange family.

prettypress-screenshot

dave winer is wrong

Or maybe he’s right. But for the wrong reason.

Over on Medium, which is where I saw his post, Dave said:

“The problem of requiring HTTPs in less than 140 chars: 1.Few benefits for blog-like sites, and 2. The costs are prohibitive.

There’s actually a #3 (sorry) — 3. For sites where the owner is gone the costs are more than prohibitive. There’s no one to do the work.”

While this was more-or-less true-ish in times gone by, with the advent of truly-free SSL (and not merely the manual free edition you could get from StartSSL) from Let’s Encrypt (see my how-to), automated, hands-off maintenance of your SSL-iness is possible (and encouraged).

There are, potentially, good reasons for saying SSL won’t be required. But blaming costs, upkeep, and “few benefits” are not among them. If anything, SSL-ifying your blog will help with some (not all) attacks launched against self-hosted/-managed services where login data can be otherwise captured in plaintext.

Dave, I like you. But you’re wrong on this one.

i’m a medium plogger now*

(*Though most people would call me an XXXL blogger.)

Following in the steps of Dave Winer, I am now plogging (sorta) on Medium.

And, like Mr Winer, I’m doing it via IFTTT (though not via RSS, I’m doing it via the WordPress channel).

If you’d like to do the same, use this IFTTT recipe.