antipaucity

fighting the lack of good ideas

what if

you blogged as often as you tweeted, facebooked, linkedinned, instagrammed, plogged, pinterested, google plussed, mastodonned, etc?

For many of us, that would be 4, 10, 20, 100, or even more blog posts per day.

Wonder how differently we would view/utilize social media if we took that approach?

Just a thought.

i wrote a thing – paragraph, a simple plugin for wordpress

Along with becoming more active on Mastodon,  I’ve been thinking more about concision recently.

One of the big selling points for Mastodon is that the character limit per post is 500 instead of Twitter’s 140.

And I was thinking, “what if there was a way to force you to write better by writing less / more compactly / more concisely?”

So after a couple weeks, I sat down and wrote an incredibly simple WordPress plugin. Introducing Paragraph.

Paragraph removes all formatting of a post or page, effectively turning it into a wall of text.

How does this help you?

If you see your writing as an uninterrupted wall of text – or a “paragraph” – you may notice that what you’re trying to say is getting lost in the noise.

It could also help force you to write more often but shorter each time.

Or maybe you’ll find it completely useless: and that’s OK, too.

wordpress plugins i use

As promised last time, I now have a page dedicated to the WordPress plugins I use.

Check it out, here.

use prettypress if you’re running a wordpress blog

Like my list of used Chrome Extensions, I’m building a list of recommended WordPress plugins.

But until I get it done, I have to give some pretty big props to PrettyPress. It’s a plugin that lets you edit in Visual, Text, and Markdown – the markup format of sites like reddit, GitHub,, GitLab, and the Stack Exchange family.

prettypress-screenshot

dave winer is wrong

Or maybe he’s right. But for the wrong reason.

Over on Medium, which is where I saw his post, Dave said:

“The problem of requiring HTTPs in less than 140 chars: 1.Few benefits for blog-like sites, and 2. The costs are prohibitive.

There’s actually a #3 (sorry) — 3. For sites where the owner is gone the costs are more than prohibitive. There’s no one to do the work.”

While this was more-or-less true-ish in times gone by, with the advent of truly-free SSL (and not merely the manual free edition you could get from StartSSL) from Let’s Encrypt (see my how-to), automated, hands-off maintenance of your SSL-iness is possible (and encouraged).

There are, potentially, good reasons for saying SSL won’t be required. But blaming costs, upkeep, and “few benefits” are not among them. If anything, SSL-ifying your blog will help with some (not all) attacks launched against self-hosted/-managed services where login data can be otherwise captured in plaintext.

Dave, I like you. But you’re wrong on this one.

i’m a medium plogger now*

(*Though most people would call me an XXXL blogger.)

Following in the steps of Dave Winer, I am now plogging (sorta) on Medium.

And, like Mr Winer, I’m doing it via IFTTT (though not via RSS, I’m doing it via the WordPress channel).

If you’d like to do the same, use this IFTTT recipe.

plogging?

Wired Magazine recently had an article on the rise of “plogging“.

By their definition, “plogging” is “PLatform blOGGING” – or blogging as part of a network/site/service (DZone, LinkedIn, Medium, Facebook, etc) instead of running your own blog somewhere (WordPress.com, Blogger, self-hosted WordPress, etc).

This seems to be a modern representation of what newspapers, magazines, etc used to be (and still are, to some extent) – a place where you can find your favorite authors all in one place.

There certainly are benefits to this model – but there is also a loss of a sense of personal connection in such a model. As I wrote before, the facebookification of society has some pros and cons. One of those cons is that companies increasingly (and now, apparently, writers) are branding on the platform/network instead of via their own site and service.

The instant network aspect of “plogging” has appeal – otherwise why would Sett exist? Or Stumbleupon? Or any of myriad other networking sites and services.

Heck, remember back in the Good Ole Days when you had link sharing and webrings?

This also plays into the walled garden effect that AOL had 20 years ago: as I wrote yesterday, Facebook is merely the new AOL. Writing in an established (or establishing) network makes a great deal of sense – an “instant” audience, the “rising tide” effect, etc.

But it also means you are bound, for better or worse, to the rules and regulations, guidelines and gaffes of the site/service you decide to write on and with. Community building is hard. Administering built communities is hard. And it doesn’t get any easier by deciding to go all-in with a “platform”. (It may not be any harder, either – but it’s not quantitatively eased by any stretch.)

Forum tools have been around since the dawn of time. And every one has had its rules. From the Areopagus to Stack Overflow, synagogues to the Supreme Court, every community has its rules. Rules which you may either choose to abide by, petition to change, or ignore (to your “detriment”, at least in the context of continuing to participate in said community).

I guess it’s like they say, “what’s new is old again”.