Tag Archives: error

hey, virtualbox – don’t be retarded

Ran across this error recently in an Ubuntu guest on my VirtualBox install: VBoxClient: (seamless): failed to start, Stage: Setting guest IRQ filter mask Error: VERR_INTERNAL_ERROR

Gee, isn’t that a useful message.

Fortunately, there was a forums.virtualbox thread on just this error.

The upshot is that this error is actually caused because of a failure during the initial install of the VirtualBox Guest Additions.

In the middle of what looks like, at quick glance, a successful GA installation, is this nugget: Please install the gcc make perl packages from your distribution.

The GA installer can’t compile kernel modules without a compiler.

And that makes sense.

What doesn’t make sense is that this error is even possible to get! The GA installer must run as root (or via sudo).

If those package are missing, the installer should stop what it’s doing, ask the user if they want to install these packages (because without them the GA installer won’t install everything), and then when the user invariably answers “yes” (because – duh! – why wouldn’t they want this to work?), go run an apt -y install gcc make perl.

But is that what Oracle in their infinite wisdom decide to do?

No. They decided it’s better to just quietly report in the middle of a bunch of success statements that “oh, by the way – couldn’t actually do what you wanted, but if you don’t notice, you’re going to spend hours on Google trying to figure it out”.

Morons.

It realy isn’t that hard to make human-friendly error messages … nor to even try to pre-solve the error condition you found!

there is no such object on the server

Gee. Thanks, Active Directory.

This is one of the more useless error messages you can get when trying to programmatically access AD.

Feel free to Google (or DuckDuckGo, or Bing, or whomever) that error message. Go ahead, I’ll wait.

Your eyes bleeding, and gray matter leaking from your ears yet? No? Then you obviously didn’t do what I just told you to – go search the error message, I’ll be here when you get back.

Background for how I found this particular gem: I have a customer (same one I was working with on SAP a while back where I had BAPI problems) that is trying to automate Active Directory user provisioning with HP Operations Orchestration. As a part of this, of course, I need to verify I can connect to their AD environment, OUs are reachable, etc etc.

In this scenario, I’m provisioning users into a custom OU (ie not merely Users).

Provisioning into Users doesn’t give this error – only in the custom OU. Which is weird. So we tried making sure there was already a user in the OU, in case the error was being kicked-back by having and empty OU (if an OU is empty, does it truly exist?).

That didn’t help.

Finally, after several hours of beard-stroking, diving into deep AD docs, MSDN articles, HP forae, and more … customer’s AD admin says, “hey – how long is the password you’re trying to use; and does it meet 3-of-4?” I reply, “it’s ‘Password!’ – 3-of-4, 9 characters long”. “Make it 14 characters long – for kicks.”

Lo and behold! There is a security policy on that OU that mandates a minimum password length as well as complexity – but that’s not even close to what AD was sending back as an error message. “There is no such object on the server”, as the end result of a failed user create, is 100% useless – all it tells you is the user isn’t there. It doesn’t say anything about why it isn’t there.

Sigh.

Yet another example of [nearly] completely ineffective error messages.

AD should give you something that resembles a why for the what – not merely the ‘what’.

Something like, “object could not be created; security policy violation” – while not 100% of the answer – would put you a lot closer to solving an issue than just “there is no such object on the server”.

Get it together, developers! When other people cannot understand your error messages, regardless of how “smart” they are, what field they work in, etc, you are Doing It Wrong™.