antipaucity

fighting the lack of good ideas

don’t use symlinks unless you *know* you can

I first ran into this on Solaris in the context of [then] Opsware SAS (then HP SA, now owned by Microfocus). Bind mounts might be OK … so unless the tarball has symlinks included, don’t use them – they get traversed differently than “real” directories.

In short, when directory traversals are done, sometimes it looks at the permissions bits and if the first character is not a d (for a symlink, it’s always an l), many processes can fail.

Symlinking files is [possibly] a different story: though permissions are usually wonky on symlinks (most often lrwxrwxrwx vs -rw-r--r--, for example), since you cannot traverse into a file (whereas you can into a directory), it’s generally ok

Also – sometimes when directory listings are pulled, the symlink is fully-dereferenced, and something that appears to be in, say, $SPLUNK_HOME/etc/deployment_apps but is really in, say, /some/other/place, there are some times when Splunk will decide not to deploy it, because it’s not where it “belongs”.

Also – checksums can be computed on the symlink and not the actual file, in some (perhaps all) instances: so if, for example, you have the same outputs.conf in several apps by way of symlink, and you change it in one, the checksum for all the others may (and typically do) not get updated … so you can be left in an inconsistent state for your configs (because not all locations that should’ve received the updated outputs.conf have received it, since they’re symlinks and not a real file, and the checksum may not update on those particular apps).

Moral of the story?

Unless you really know what you’re doing, never use symlinks with Splunk.

a few selected horizon points

Based on some slightly simplified math, here are approximate distances to an uninterrupted horizon from various viewing heights:

  • 6 feet – slightly-above-average human eye level: 3 miles
  • 20 feet – top of the roof of a typical one-story house: 5.5 miles
  • 50 feet – short hill / top of a tree or boom truck: 8.7 miles
  • 100 feet – ~10th story window : 12.3 miles
  • 250 feet – ~20th floor of an office building: 19.4 miles
  • 350 feet – top of the Cliffs of Dover: 22.9 miles
  • 1050 feet – Empire State Building observation deck: 39.7 miles
  • 1800 feet – observatory of Burj Khalifa : 52 miles
  • 14,115 feet – top of Pike’s Peak: 145.6 miles

on internet sales tax

The debate is raging again as the Supreme Court of the United States is getting ready to make a decision on collecting sales tax for online sales.

I’ve read as many viewpoints from supporting and detracting from requiring businesses to collect sales tax from their customers.

And my [current] view is that all businesses conducting business online should collect the sales tax you would have paid if you went in person.

Company in Oregon? No sales tax. Company in Kentucky? Sales tax.

Don’t collect it for whereever the buyer happens to be: collect it based on where the seller is.

Simple.

Straighforward.

And is something the merchant is already setup to do.