antipaucity

fighting the lack of good ideas

calvin coolidge on watching your words

three keys to success, from travis chappell

invest your time wisely
Invest Your Time Wisely

don’t worry about the mules…

Don't worry about the mules...Just load the wagon

tesla’s cybertruck [almost] does two things i’ve said for a long time

“Telsa will add solar power to the Cybertruck to generate 15 miles per day. Fold-out solar wings for the Cybertruck would generate 30 to 40 miles per day. The average daily commute in the US averages 30 miles per day.”

https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2019/11/solar-power-tesla-cybertruck-could-have-free-15-40-mile-daily-commutes.html (https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1197889310550216704)

Or remember my comments on SolarCity 3 years ago?

Offering a solar option (or standard) tonneau cover for the bed is an absolute no-brainer. When you own the solar production plant, why wouldn’t you include it?

But more than this, the multi-motor options are a real-world implementation of something I’ve been saying for 20+ years: it makes far more sense to put a motor at (or very near) each wheel or at least axel in an electric vehicle than it does to have one that’s distributing its work everywhere.

Sure, running the cabling to each wheel/axel is a little complicated – but it’s a lot less complicated than drivetrains.

on color choices

How should you choose color? From illustration to visualization (which, of course, is a form of illustration).

https://flowingdata.com/2019/07/30/illustrated-color-theory

visual text messaging

That’s what Marco Polo is.

Visual text messaging.

With the added perk of being able to save videos you make to your local device for sharing elsehow and elsewhere.

And that, I think, is it’s true Killer Feature™ – the ability to take selfie videos, get more or less instant feedback, make a few tweaks, and then post it for the world to see (if you’re into that kind of thing).

you can’t disaggregate

Had a customer recently ask about to disaggregate a Splunk search that had aggregated fields because they export to CSV horribly.

Here’s the thing.

You can’t disaggregate aggregated fields.

And there’s a Good Reason™, too: aggregation, by definition, is a one-way street.

You can’t un-average something.

Average is an aggregation function.

So why would you think you could disaggregate any other Splunk aggregation operation (like values or list)?

You can’t.

And you shouldn’t be able to (as nice as the theoretical use case for it might be).

So what is a body to do when you have a use case for a clean-to-export report that looks as if it had been aggregated, but every field in each row cleanly plunks-out to a single comma-separated value?

Here’s what I did:

{parent search}
| join {some field that'll exist in the subsearch}
[ search {parent search}
 | stats {some stats functions here} ]
| fields - {whatever you don't want}
| sort - {fieldname}

What does that end up doing?

The subsearch is identical to the outer search, plus whatever filtering/where/|stats you might want/need to do.

Using the resultant, filtered set, join on a field you know will be unique [enough].

Then sort however you’d like, and remove whatever fields you don’t want in the final display.


Of course, be sure your subsearch will complete in under 60 seconds and/or return fewer than 10,000 lines (unless you’ve modified your Splunk limits.conf)