antipaucity

fighting the lack of good ideas

libraries should be print-on-demand centers – especially for old/unusual works

Want to reinvigorate old texts and library patronage? Turn libraries into print-on-demand book “publishers” for works in the public domain and/or which aren’t under copyright in the current country and/or some kind of library version of CCLI churches use for music!

This idea came to me after reading this blog post from the Internet Archive (famous for the Wayback Machine).

Libraries have always bought publisher’s products but have traditionally offered alternative access modes to these materials, and can again. As an example let’s take newspapers. Published with scoops and urgency, yesterday is “old news,” the paper it was printed on is then only useful the next day as “fish wrap”– the paper piles up and we felt guilty about the trash. That is the framing of the publisher: old is useless, new is valuable.

…the library is in danger in our digital world. In print, one could keep what one had read. In digital that is harder technically, and publishers are specifically making it harder.

So why not enable a [modest] money-making function for your local library? With resources from places like the Internet Archive, the Gutenberg Project, Kindle free books, blog posts, and on and on – there’s a veritable cornucopia of formerly-available (or only digitally-available) material that has value, but whose availability is sadly lacking: especially for those who don’t have reliable internet access, eReaders, etc. (Or folks like me who don’t especially like reading most books (especially fiction) on a device.)

I’d wager Creative Commons could gin-up some great licenses for this!

Who’s with me‽

chelsea troy – designing a course

Via the rands-leadership Slack (in the #i-wrote-something channel), I found an article written on ChealseaTroy.com that was [the last?] in her series on course design.

While I found part 9 interesting, I was bummed there were no internal links to the other parts of the series (at least to previous parts (even if there may be future parts not linked in a given post)).

To rectify that for my 6 readers, and as a resource for myself, here is a table of contents for her series:
  1. What will students learn?
  2. How will the sessions go?
  3. What will we do in a session?
  4. Teaching methods for remoteness
  5. Why use group work?
  6. Dividing students into groups
  7. Planning collaborative activities
  8. Use of surveys
  9. Iterating on the course
She also has some other related, though not part of the “series”, posts I found interesting:
  1. Learning to teach a course
  2. Planning and surviving a 3-hour lecture
  3. Resources for programming instructors
  4. Syllabus design

If you notice future entries to this series (before I do), please comment below so I can add them 🤓