antipaucity

fighting the lack of good ideas

the coop (with lots of in-progress pictures)

As promised a few days ago, here’s the Big Writeup™ on our new coop

First, the pictures

That’s a lotta pictures! And I didn’t post them all ?

Some of the key features of the this coop:

  • 6’x8′ exterior floor dimensions
  • the floor’s covered in peel-n-stick vinyl tiles for easy cleaning
  • 12′ roof, which overhangs on the high and low sides by ~2′, and on the other two sides by ~1′
  • 4′ wide, 12′ long roof over the first part of the run
    • both roofs drop ~2′ over the 8′ of the width of the coop – making snow accumulation very unlikely
  • coop’s elevated about 30″ off the ground (makes for easy emptying of bedding material into wheel barrow)
  • pair of 6′ roosting bars
  • pair of 3-berth nesting boxes, with easy access from the outside (way better than the old coop, which mandated opening the door to get to them)
  • 8’x24′ fully enclosed-run
  • plenty of ventilation (including removable window covers on the run side of the coop for use during the colder months)
  • plenty of light – there’s a 2’x6′ skylight on the high side of the coop
  • cleated entry ramp for the chickens to get from the ramp to the coop
  • as close to predator-proof as is reasonable to do
    • hardware cloth over the rear access gates, all windows, and the run door
    • poulty netting around the entirety of the run, with a second stretch of welded-wire over the bottom 30″
    • poultry netting & cedar pickets enclosing two sides of the shaded region under the coop
    • poultry netting or pickets blocking open access to the roof rafters
  • mostly weather-proof location for feeder and waters (partially under the coop on the run side)
  • full-height run access door (was able to repurpose and reinforce an old screen door I had)
  • run anchored against sliding with 12″ rebars driven into the ground around the base

What improvements do know I have left?

  • add water collection system to capture runoff
    • this will also allow for [semi]automatic watering vs schlepping a couple gallons of water a day to the waterer
  • shedette on the back side of the coop (facing away from the house) for food, tool, etc storage

How long did it take?

Calendar time, start to finish was about 3.5 months

Work time, start to finish was about 10-12 days

How much did it cost?

…more than I wish – but less than it could have 😉

Seriously, though – it wasn’t horrible: well under $2000 total 🙂

Could probably have saved some more on cost if I hadn’t bought the coop frame materials in July 2021 … but – c’est la vie: it had to be done, so we done did it 🙂

What would I do differently if I knew then what I know now?

First, I wouldn’t have preframed the wall panels – precut all the materials, sure: but preframing the walls turned out to make it more difficult to assemble than I had hoped

Second, I’d’ve accounted for materials better, so I didn’t have to make quite as many trips to my local Lowes ?

Third, I’d’ve made it 8’x8′ so I’d’ve had less cutting of plywood to do 🙂

Fourth, I’d’ve placed the floor cover (whether peel-n-stick tiles, or linoleum, or something else entirely) before mounting the floor to the posts and adding the walls – would’ve been way simpler!

Should you build a coop more-or-less like this one?

I don’t know – he’s on third, and I don’t give a darn!

Whoops – out popped an old comedy routine quote 😛

If you’ve got the space and the inclination to build it, something like this on your property could be an absolute blast of a project to undertake! I had more fun than not getting it built and ready for the chickens

If you decide to build a coop like this one, let me know! I’d love to see how yours turns out!

If you’d like copies of the rough drawings I made of each part, I’d be happy to share those, too

sometimes i’m off

It took Apple 5.5 (or 6, if you count last week as really hitting it) years to introduce what I called the MacBook Flex back in 2015.

With the 13″ MacBook Pro available in an M1-powered edition (which is so much better than the top-end MBP from 2019…it’s not even funny), and now a 5G-enabled iPad Pro running on the M1 … it’s here.

vampires *can* coexist with zombies

I made a mistake 4 years ago.

I said vampires and zombies couldn’t [long] coexist. Because they’d be competing for the same – dwindling – food source: the living (vs them both being undead).

But I was wrong.

If the universe in which they exist is a mash-up of that of Twilight and iZombie … it could work.

The iZombie universe has zombies that can avoid going “full Romero” by maintaining a steady supply of brains – and it’s not much they need to eat to stay “normal”.

The Twilight universe has vampires that can survive on animal blood (or, one presumes, by hitting-up blood banks).

So if you were to have “brain banks” the way you have “blood banks” – I could see it working.

Now we just need some iZombie-Twilight hybrid vambie/zompire creatures running around.

following-up to my ubi mindwalk

I omitted something kinda big when I wrote my one-time UBI proposal last year.

I neglected to address welfare reform.

Welfare would have to be changed for UBI to even have a half a prayer of working.

The “easy” way to do this would be to phase-in reduced welfare benefits on a prorated-equivalent basis for the UBI payment you receive.

Surely there are many other ways to address welfare as part of the one-time universal basic income – suggest them below!

Do I have to participate?

And I missed a second point, too – this should be something you can opt-out of. Just like I wrote about Social Security lo those many moons ago.

No one should be forced to participate – though I strongly suspect most people would rather participate than not.

What about when the program starts?

A third missed point in last year’s thought experiment – a prorated one-time UBI for every citizen over 18 when the program starts. Take the average life expectancy of a USian of, say, 75 years. Subtract 18 to get 57 – there is your basis “100%” one-time payment.

There also needs to be a phase-out cap on one-time benefits at age 74 (ie, when you turn 75, you are no longer eligible to receive a payout).

Now take your age, subtract 18, and divide by 57, and subtract from 100% to get your prorated payment. Are you 27? (27-18)/57 = ~15.8%. 100%-15.8% = 84.2%.

84.2% of $100,000 is $84,200.

Same process if you’re 50: (50-18)/57 = ~56.1%. 100%-56.1% = 43.9%.

43.9% of $100,000 is $43,900.

What if you’re 80? Congratulations! You’ve outlived the average American!

next update: keeping your let’s encrypt certs up-to-date

I noticed I haven’t updated my previous post on keeping my Let’s Encrypt certs updated since building-out a couple new servers.

systemctl stop httpd.service
/bin/certbot renew --preferred-challenges http-01,dns-01 --must-staple
systemctl start httpd.service
systemctl restart postfix

Not a big change, but one worth making

If you haven’t installed certbot yet, you should

goodbye, self-hosted mastodon

It was nice knowing you. No really. It was.

I don’t say that because I found anything wrong in the fediverse.

Nope.

It’s entirely because a recent apt update not only broke my sweetree.ga instance, it irrecoverably broke it.

Guess I’ll have to use that domain somewhere somehow somewhen else.

Maybe I’ll try you again in a couple years.

rethinking pi-hole (again)

About 2 years ago, I started running Pi-hole as a DNS resolver and ad-blocker. Then last year, I ditched it.

After seeing a recent post by Troy Hunt, though, I thought it might be worth revisiting..but I needed a better way to control how it worked.

Enter OpenVPN – a service I already run on three endpoints. Here’s what I did:

Install Pi-hole per the usual (curl -sSL https://install.pi-hole.net | bash if you’re feeling brave, curl -sSL https://install.pi-hole.net, inspect, then run, if you’re feeling a little more wary).

This time, though, I set my upstream DNS providers to Cloudflare (1.1.1.1) and Quad9 (9.9.9.9) instead of Freenom and Google.

I also did a two-step install – once with Pi-hole listening on the primary network interface on my OpenVPN endpoint (ie the public IP), and then, once I made sure all was happy, I flipped it to listen on tun0 – the OpenVPN-provided interface. This means Pi-hole can only hear DNS queries if you’re connected to the VPN.

Why the change from how I’d done it before? Two reasons (at least):

First, if you leave Pi-hole open to the world, you can get involved in DNS amplification attacks. That is muy no bueno.

Second, sometimes I don’t care about ads – sometimes I do. I don’t care, for example, most of the time when I’m home. But when I’m traveling or on my iPhone? I care a lot more then.

Bonus – since it’s only “working” when connected to my VPN, it’s super easy to check if a site isn’t working because of Pi-hole, or because it just doesn’t like my browser (hop off the VPN, refresh, and see if all is well that wasn’t when on the VPN).

Changes you need to make to your OpenVPN’s server.conf:


push "dhcp-option DNS 10.8.0.1"

This ensures clients use the OpenVPN server as their DNS resolver. (Note: 10.8.0.1 might not be your OpenVPN parent IP address; adjust as necessary.) Restart OpenVPN after making this change.

My setupVars.conf for Pi-hole:


PIHOLE_INTERFACE=tun0
IPV4_ADDRESS=10.8.0.1/24
IPV6_ADDRESS=
QUERY_LOGGING=true
INSTALL_WEB_SERVER=true
INSTALL_WEB_INTERFACE=true
LIGHTTPD_ENABLED=false
WEBPASSWORD=01f3217c12bcdf8aa0ca08cdf737f99cd68a46dbdc92ce35fd75f39ce2faaf81
DNSMASQ_LISTENING=single
PIHOLE_DNS_1=1.1.1.1
PIHOLE_DNS_2=1.0.0.1
PIHOLE_DNS_3=9.9.9.9
DNS_FQDN_REQUIRED=true
DNS_BOGUS_PRIV=true
DNSSEC=false
CONDITIONAL_FORWARDING=false

I tried getting lighttpd to only listen on on port 443 so I could use Let’s Encrypt’s SSL certs following a handful of tutorials and walk-throughs, but was unsuccessful. So I disabled lighttpd, and only start it by hand if I want to check on my Pi-hole’s status.

Speaking of which, as I write this, here is what the admin console looks like:

admin console screenshot

Hope this helps you.